The Bonnie Lass of Fyvie-o
                Traditional, arr. by Theiss & O'Connor

This song is typical of a great number of folk songs with a common theme: the relationship of a soldier and a maid he encounters while on a military campaign. The relationship usually causes a problem for one or both of the parties involved.  And while the verses are usually serious, the melodies can be light and the pace fast.   Compare this song to "Fannerio" sung by Judy Collins (Golden Apples of the Sun).  The similarities are remarkable, from the names and settings to the beat of the song.  It took us quite a while to research the places mentioned in this song, but they do (or did) exist.  We took a few liberties with some of the lyrics just so they would make sense to us.

Album: Traditional and Original/Theiss & O'Connor;  Singin' Our Minds/The Chad Mitchell Trio

There once was a troop of Irish dragoons
Come marchin' down through Fyvie-o
And the captain fell in love with a very bonnie lass
And the name she was called was pretty Peggy-o.

There's many a bonnie lass in the town of Auchterless
There's many a bonnie lassie in the Gairioch
There's many a bonnie Jean in the streets of Aberdeen
But the flower of them all is in Fyvie-o.

Well, I'll give you ribbons love and I'll give you rings
I'll give you a necklace of amber-o
So come on down the stair and comb back your yellow hair
And we'll march through the bonnie streets of Fyvie-o.

The colonel he cried, "Mount, boys. Mount, boys and ride
Down through the fields to Fennario."
"Oh, tarry yet a day." We heard our captain say
"Till I see if the bonnie lass will marry-o."

The colonel in a rage drew his pistol and took aim
At the man who would question his order-o.
He fired the deadly ball and our captain he did fall
As we marched through the bonnie streets of Fyvie-o.

It's lang ere we left the town of Auchterless
We had our young captain to carry-o.
And lang ere we came into bonnie Aberdeen
That we had our captain to bury-o.

Green grow the birks on bonnie Ethanside
And low lie the lowlands of Fyvie-o
Our captain's name was Ned and he died for a maid
He died for the bonnie lass of Fyvie-o.

There once was a troop of Irish dragoons
Come marchin' down through Fyvie-o
And the captain fell in love with a very bonnie lass
And the name she was called was pretty Peggy-o.